League

League, n. leeg. [Fr. ligue; It. lega; Sp. lige; from L. ligo, to bind]
     An alliance or confederacy between princes or states for their mutual aid or defense; a national contract or compact. A league may be offensive or defensive, or both. It is offensive, when the contracting parties agree to united in attacking a common enemy; defensive, when the parties agree to act in concert in defending each other against the enemy.
     A combination or union of two or more parties for the purpose of maintaining friendship and promoting their mutual interest, or for executing any design in concert.
American Dictionary of the English Language, Noah Webster 1828, Vol. II, 5.

League, v. i. leeg.
     To unite, as princes or states in a contract of amity for mutual aid or defense; as to confederate. Russia and Austria leagued to oppose the ambition of Buonaparte.
     To unite or confederate, as private persons for mutual aid.
American Dictionary of the English Language, Noah Webster 1828, Vol. II, 5.

League. A measurement of length, which consist of three geographical miles. The jurisdiction of the United States extends into the sea a marine league. See acts of the Congress of June 5, 1794, and April 20, 1818; 1 Walt, State Papers 195.
     A conspiracy to do an unlawful act. The term is but little used.
     An agreement or treaty between states. Leagues between states are of several kinds: First, leagues offensive or defensive, by which two or more nations agree not only to defend each other, but carry on war against their common enemies. Second, defensive, but not offensive, obliging each to defend the other against any foreign invasion. Third, leagues of simple amity, by which on contracts not to invade, injure, or offend the other: this usually includes the liberty of mutual commerce and trade, and the safeguard of merchants and traders in each others domain. Bacon, Abr. Prerogative (D 4). See Peace; Truce; War.
Bouvierís Law Dictionary, Third Revision (8th Edition)(1914) Volume 2, page 1887.

League. 1. A treaty of alliance between different states or parties. 2. A measure of distance, varying in different countries.

It may be offensive or defensive, or both. It is offensive when the contracting parties agree to unite in attacking a common enemy; defensive when the parties agree to act in concert in defend each other against an enemy. Wharton. Blackís Law Dictionary 4th Edition (1951), page 1034

League1. 1 a compact or covenant made by nations, groups, or individuals for promoting common interests, assuring mutual protection, etc. 2 an association or alliance of individuals, groups, or nations formed by such a covenant. 3 Sports a group of teams organized to compete against one another.
Websterís New World Dictionary, 3rd College Ed.(1988), page 768.